How do I get my dog to stop jumping on people who visit?

Asked by Christina

2 Answers

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Answered by Caryl Wolff, Dog TrainerPRO+ in Los Angeles, CA
Dogs usually get excited when a visitor comes to the door, and they jump to get their attention. There are several things that can be done to stop jumping:

Have your dog on leash when you answer the door and don't take the leash off until he calms down.

Teach him to Sit or Go to a Mat when you open the door.

Prevent him from coming to the door by putting him in another room with a closed door or his crate or tethering him to a heavy piece of furniture away from the door.

Take a basic obedience class so you learn how to communicate with him effectively and your dog learns to listen to you.

Best regards,

Caryl | 09.18.15 @ 15:55
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$commenter.renderDisplayableName() — {comment} | 09.26.17 @ 00:02
Answered by Yolanda Freeman CPDT-KA, CTDI, Dog TrainerPRO+ in Fort Lauderdale, FL
Often a dog's default greeting is to jump, especially if it was encouraged when the dog was small and adorable.

Don't wait to teach a puppy not to jump and don't expect a dog to stop jumping if it has been doing so all its life up to this point, without training. Teach your dog to sit for greetings. The dog must not be petted unless all 4 paws are on the floor. I recommend having treats in your hand and feeding your dog while it is sitting with it's back to the guest..

This can keep your dog from getting over excited by a face-to-face greetings. This can work especially well for children who are often fearful of a dogs open mouth and teeth and tend to reach out to the dog then suddenly jerk their hand back. A trainer can help you set up and practice door greeting scenarios so you don't have to impose on your guest when all they want to do is come in and say, "hi" Remember that everyday your dog is practicing how to greet people with you, every time you enter your home. So if your dog won't do it for you, it won't do it for anyone else either.

| 09.24.15 @ 18:14
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$commenter.renderDisplayableName() — {comment} | 09.26.17 @ 00:02
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Answered by

Caryl Wolff
Caryl Wolff, Dog TrainerPRO+ in Los Angeles, CA