My friend gave me a kitten will be a year ago come October. I've taken her to a Vet 2 times and still she has goop in her eyes.

She is a Siamese. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Asked by Mary

2 Answers

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Hi Mary, thanks for joining LovePets!

Please can you answer these questions for me...

Is your cat sick at all i.e sneezing or runny nose?
Are both eyes affected the same or just one eye? Is the eye sore looking or tears present?
How is your cat in herself? eating normally? bright and alert?
Does she seem bothered by the eyes?
Is she fully vaccinated?

Siamese cats are prone to "eye goop" unfortunately and in most cases it is just a matter of gently wiping it away with some wet cotton. Many people believe it to be an anatomical issue in that tears are not easily drained away from the eye.

Allergies, bacteria, dust (and other foreign bodies), viruses such as feline herpes rhinotracheitis and calicivirus, plus several other causes, are potential things to rule out though. | 08.19.15 @ 14:32
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$commenter.renderDisplayableName() — {comment} | 11.24.17 @ 09:30
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Answered by Michael and LIsa
We have a very healthy and lively, 16 year old female Siamese cat and an equally healthy 7 year old Siamese male . She has always been prone to “eye goop” — which collects on the INNER corner of her eye, never on the outer corner — while he almost never has any. I’m not a vet, so you’d have to ask one if gender plays a part in this. My own guess is that it doesn’t. The help I can offer here has to do with “how" to remove the goop without startling your cat by poking at her eyes.

Here’s how my wife and I do it: While gently stroking the side of her head in a downward direction with your palm (do one side at a time), come down gently OVER the eye, toward her nose, and the goop will become unhinged by your palm. Sometimes it takes two downward strokes to finish the job. Years ago, we tried using our fingers, a wash cloth and wet cotton to do this, but all of those approaches caused our cat to recoil, as she warily saw foreign objects coming at her eye. Using this approach, you don’t introduce any drama over removing foreign material from her eye. Instead, you accomplish the removal gently, organically — and surreptitiously — through the welcome action of lovingly stroking her face.
| 08.19.15 @ 15:40
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$commenter.renderDisplayableName() — {comment} | 11.24.17 @ 09:30
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